The Year of the Woman

The past year has been exciting as more women have been discovering their power and their legacy. It brings to mind the old Helen Reddy women’s anthem of the 1970s: I am woman, hear me roar. The “roaring” should continue to grow as we soon enter a year-long celebration leading up to the 100th anniversary of American women receiving the right to vote. Yep, the Nineteenth Amendment will be 100 years old on August 18, 2020.

And because women still needing to be heard and treated fairly, we can reach into women’s history to learn the stories of those who came before us. I have two more kid’s books coming out this September, bringing my total number of published books about women tied with the number of my published books about Native American history (and yes, one dream is to combine the two and write about amazing Native American women).

Women in science, technology, and politics. Women who were ignored or silenced, but still broke down barriers. Some of these are women I had never heard of when I was a child, but who are now becoming well-known. For example, in the upcoming Gutsy Girls Go for Science Paleontologists, I begin the book with the story of Mary Anning.

It’s hard not to come across the name of this British fossil hunter and paleontologist these days. In fact, a Google search gave up 1,350,000 results in 0.51 seconds. She’s all over educational websites, but she is also featured at events like the annual Lyme Regis Fossil Festival and captured in the movies. A two-part biopic is nearing completion, and another film, Ammonite, starring Kate Winslet, will be released in 2020.

And the other book, Gutsy Girls Go for Science Programmers, features two other rock stars—Ada Lovelace and Grace Hopper. The world celebrates the first computer programmer and other women in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) on the second Tuesday of October each year. This past year marked the 10th anniversary of Ada Lovelace Day, and each year sees more and more participants.

Various programs and awards are named after computer scientist Grace Hopper. The ACM Grace Hopper annual award goes to an outstanding young computer professional responsible for a major technical or service contribution. An early programmer of modern computers, Hopper was instrumental in developing programming languages that could work on different computers. Without this, would the PC have ever been born?

I think we’ll soon hear more about women like Sylvia Earle, Barbara McClintock, and Harriet Quimby—all women I’ve written about. Yet, even as more women from history are getting their due, there are still many more whose names we don’t know…yet. I can’t tell you how many times after a book’s publication that I’ve discovered an amazing woman I wished I had included. Women like:

  • Elizabeth Blackburn
  • Euphemia Haynes
  • Florence Siebert
  • Julie Packard
  • Maria Mitchell
  • Mary McWhinnie
  • Mary Sherman
  • Melba Roy Mouton
  • Pearl Scott

Have you heard of all of these women? Perhaps one or two ring a bell, but I’m betting there’s some you haven’t heard of. Start Googling and researching some of these names. Learn their stories. And then share them. It’s the Year of the Woman.

About KB Gibson

I am a writer who writes a little of everything--fiction, travel, children's books and articles, copywriting, curriculum.My perfect vacation would be to sit on a beach or look out over the mountains and read books. I never get to read as much as I want.
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