Do We Need More Books About Women in STEM?

After a long wait, my latest books are out. The new Gutsy Girls Go for Science series comes from Nomad Press. I wrote two of the four releases, Paleontologists and Programmers. The other two are Astronauts and Engineers.

Yes, this makes two more books in my repertoire about notable females in exceling in non-traditional careers. They join two books I did for a Girls in Science Series: Marine Biology: Cool Women Who Dive and Meteorology: Cool Women Who Weather Storms (also Nomad Press). These were all written for 8-to-12 year old readers. Another couple of books, Women Aviators and Women in Space (Chicago Review Press) are for young adults.

Why more kid’s books about interesting women? Because girls need to know that “boy” jobs or “girl” jobs are a myth. They need to know about females who came before us, meeting with resistance, but persisting. Girls need to know that they can truly be whatever they want to be.

Let’s start with programmers. As Gutsy Girls Go for Science: Programmers shares, the earliest computer programmers were…female! Men were into the hardware until they realized that operating systems and software made all the difference in expanding who used computers.

By 1970, women earned only 13.6% of the bachelor’s degrees in computer science. That number rose to 37% by 1984, but by the time PCs came into our workplaces and homes, that percentage had been cut in half. Also since PCs became all the rage in the 1990s, the percentage of women working in the field dropped from 35% to 26% by 2013.

In paleontology, the odds are even worse. For a very long time, women were denied admission into professional science organizations even though women like Mary Anning made significant discoveries. And even once they were eventually admitted, women were supposed to stay in the labs or the classroom instead of doing fieldwork. Again, there were women who persisted. Many of them were subject to sexual harassment.

Women make up only 23% of the membership of the Paleontological Society. That number drops to 17% when you look at non-students, or the professionals. In the Earth Sciences, women earn 38% of bachelor degrees, 43.4% of master degrees, and 39.9% of Ph.Ds. Although most scientists with Ph.D’s work for universities, women make up only 16% of geoscience faculty in the United States. Furthermore, studies show that women are less likely to be hired, and when they are, they are subject to a lower salary (about $10,000 less for Ph.D’s) and sexual harassment. An excellent representation of women in the field is The Bearded Lady Project documentary.

We know things must change, and change comes from education and opportunities. STEM for girls programs like National Girls Collaborative Project and Girls Who Code help by exposing and encouraging girls to science and technology from a young age. And yes, this is why we need STEM books highlighting women in different fields. Professional organizations like the American Association of University Women pick up the ball once it reaches higher education.

We need technology and science organizations to step up and demand diversity in their fields. And more female mentors makes a world of difference for young girls wrestling with that age-old childhood dilemma–What do I want to be when I grow up?

The National Women’s History Alliance motto for this year is: Nevertheless, she persisted.

Books like Gutsy Girls Go for Science show us women who persisted. Let’s cheer on all females who demonstrate what’s possible.

About KB Gibson

I am a writer who writes a little of everything--fiction, travel, children's books and articles, copywriting, curriculum.My perfect vacation would be to sit on a beach or look out over the mountains and read books. I never get to read as much as I want.
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